DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME FLOOR PLANS. DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE


DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME FLOOR PLANS. FLOORING WHOLESALE PRICES



Double Wide Mobile Home Floor Plans





double wide mobile home floor plans






    double wide
  • Mobile homes or static caravans (also informally called "caravans" or "trailers") are prefabricated homes built in factories, rather than on site, and then taken to the place where they will be occupied.

  • A box that is twice as wide as a ten frame box. 32 1/2" wide.

  • (of a semipermanent mobile home) Consisting of two separate units connected on site

  • Double Wide is rock/rap artist Uncle Kracker's debut album. It was released on Lava Records. The CRIA certified it platinum in August 2001.





    mobile home
  • a large house trailer that can be connected to utilities and can be parked in one place and used as permanent housing

  • A large house trailer that is parked in one particular place and used as a permanent living accommodation

  • Mobile Home is the second and final album by Longpigs, released in 1999 on U2's record label Mother.

  • Mobile homes or static caravans (also informally called "caravans" or "trailers") are prefabricated homes built in factories, rather than on site, and then taken to the place where they will be occupied.





    floor plans
  • A scale diagram of the arrangement of rooms in one story of a building

  • (floor plan) scale drawing of a horizontal section through a building at a given level; contrasts with elevation

  • (Floor planning) Floorplanning is the act of designing of a floorplan, which is a kind of bird's-eye view of a structure.

  • In architecture and building engineering, a floor plan, or floorplan, is a diagram, usually to scale, showing the relationships between rooms, spaces and other physical features at one level of a structure.











66-08 Forest Avenue (aka 679 Grandview Avenue)




66-08 Forest Avenue (aka 679 Grandview Avenue)





Ridgewood, Queens, New York City, New York, United States

Southeast (Korean Street, Shown in this photograph) elevation: Two bay, buff-colored brick facade with amber-colored brick base; one-over-one, double-hung windows in all bays at second and third floors; segmental and arched, ambercolored brick lintels, and limestone string course and projecting limestone sills at second and third floor windows; projecting and recessed decorative brick string coursing; amber brick pilasters with carved limestone capitals; tan-painted, denticulated and modillioned cornice with semi-circular pediment with sunburst motif. Alterations: Aluminum replacement windows in all openings; non-historic paired doors with grills and brick infill at ground floor; large East (Forest Avenue) elevation: Eight bay, buff-colored brick facade with amber-colored brick base; oneover- one, double-hung windows in all bays at second and third floors; segmental and arched, amber-colored brick lintels, and limestone string course and projecting limestone sills at second and third floor windows; projecting and recessed decorative brick string coursing; bluestone quoins and band course at base; tanpainted, denticulated and modillioned cornice. Alterations: Aluminum replacement windows in all openings; masonry infill and non-historic fenestration replace storefronts at ground floor; non-historic metal grilles at windows and doors at ground floor; electrical conduit at facade; large sign in sixth and seventh bays at ground floor.

Southwest (Grandview Avenue) elevation: Eight bay, buff-colored brick facade with amber-colored brick base; cast-stone lintels and string coursing at ground floor; cast-stone brackets with guttae at entrances; bluestone quoins and band course at base; one-over-one, double-hung windows in all openings except 26 fourth and fifth bays at ground floor; segmental and arched, amber-colored brick lintels, and limestone string course and projecting limestone sills at second and third floor windows; projecting and recessed decorative brick string coursing; tan-painted, denticulated and modillioned cornice. Alterations: Aluminum replacement windows in all openings; masonry infill and tripartite windows replace storefronts at ground floor; non-historic doors; window grilles at ground floor; non-historic metal fire escape; conduit at facade.


The Ridgewood North Historic District is significant as an intact grouping of structures that reflect the development of model tenements in Ridgewood in the early 20th century. A contiguous district in both typology and style, it is composed of 96 buildings, primarily three story brick tenements, that encompass almost eight square acres in southwest Queens. The tenements were constructed between 1908 and 1914, mainly by the G.X. Mathews Company.

Known as “Mathews Model Flats,” these “new law” tenements had larger rooms and more adequate sanitary facilities than their 19th-century predecessors. Built in long rows of repeated designs that create a sense of place, the facades retain a high degree of integrity and are distinguished by their buff- and amber-colored brick facades, carved-stone details, ornate pressed metal cornices, and stoop and areaway ironwork.

Transportation improvements and the consolidation of Greater New York City contributed to the development of Ridgewood, which was characterized by open farmland and several amusement parks in the 19th century. Denser building activity had begun with the coming of the electric trolley in 1894, and after 1898, Ridgewood was subjected to the eastward expansion of a growing New York City. Located adjacent to Brooklyn’s Eastern District (which contained the communities of Bushwick, Williamsburg and Greenpoint), Ridgewood became an ideal location for upwardly mobile German-Americans to relocate, away from the over-crowding and more recent immigrants inhabiting Bushwick and Williamsburg, as well as Lower East Side.

Corresponding with the construction of the buildings in the historic district, urbanization was triggered by the opening of the elevated train around the turn of the century. Providing rapid and dependable rail service, the “El” was extended from its original terminus at Myrtle and Wyckoff Avenues to Fresh Pond Road and 67th Avenue in 1915.

German immigrant Gustave X. Mathews began building in Bushwick and Ridgewood in the first decade of the 20th century. Using wider lots, large air shafts, private bathrooms, and limiting occupancy to two families per floor, Mathews’ “cold-water flats” were a radical improvement to the overcrowded tenement houses of Williamsburg and the Lower East Side. By creating improved living quarters and controlling costs so that the apartments could be affordable to families of modest income, Mathews found a niche in the real estate market and met with immediate success. He built and sold over 300 tenements in Ridgewood between 1909 and 1912, receiving 25% the tenement house permits issued in Queens in 1911.











66-08 Forest Avenue (aka 679 Grandview Avenue)




66-08 Forest Avenue (aka 679 Grandview Avenue)





Ridgewood, Queens

Southeast (Korean Street, Shown in this photograph) elevation: Two bay, buff-colored brick facade with amber-colored brick base; one-over-one, double-hung windows in all bays at second and third floors; segmental and arched, ambercolored brick lintels, and limestone string course and projecting limestone sills at second and third floor windows; projecting and recessed decorative brick string coursing; amber brick pilasters with carved limestone capitals; tan-painted, denticulated and modillioned cornice with semi-circular pediment with sunburst motif. Alterations: Aluminum replacement windows in all openings; non-historic paired doors with grills and brick infill at ground floor; large East (Forest Avenue) elevation: Eight bay, buff-colored brick facade with amber-colored brick base; oneover- one, double-hung windows in all bays at second and third floors; segmental and arched, amber-colored brick lintels, and limestone string course and projecting limestone sills at second and third floor windows; projecting and recessed decorative brick string coursing; bluestone quoins and band course at base; tanpainted, denticulated and modillioned cornice. Alterations: Aluminum replacement windows in all openings; masonry infill and non-historic fenestration replace storefronts at ground floor; non-historic metal grilles at windows and doors at ground floor; electrical conduit at facade; large sign in sixth and seventh bays at ground floor.

Southwest (Grandview Avenue) elevation: Eight bay, buff-colored brick facade with amber-colored brick base; cast-stone lintels and string coursing at ground floor; cast-stone brackets with guttae at entrances; bluestone quoins and band course at base; one-over-one, double-hung windows in all openings except 26 fourth and fifth bays at ground floor; segmental and arched, amber-colored brick lintels, and limestone string course and projecting limestone sills at second and third floor windows; projecting and recessed decorative brick string coursing; tan-painted, denticulated and modillioned cornice. Alterations: Aluminum replacement windows in all openings; masonry infill and tripartite windows replace storefronts at ground floor; non-historic doors; window grilles at ground floor; non-historic metal fire escape; conduit at facade.


The Ridgewood North Historic District is significant as an intact grouping of structures that reflect the development of model tenements in Ridgewood in the early 20th century. A contiguous district in both typology and style, it is composed of 96 buildings, primarily three story brick tenements, that encompass almost eight square acres in southwest Queens. The tenements were constructed between 1908 and 1914, mainly by the G.X. Mathews Company.

Known as “Mathews Model Flats,” these “new law” tenements had larger rooms and more adequate sanitary facilities than their 19th-century predecessors. Built in long rows of repeated designs that create a sense of place, the facades retain a high degree of integrity and are distinguished by their buff- and amber-colored brick facades, carved-stone details, ornate pressed metal cornices, and stoop and areaway ironwork.

Transportation improvements and the consolidation of Greater New York City contributed to the development of Ridgewood, which was characterized by open farmland and several amusement parks in the 19th century. Denser building activity had begun with the coming of the electric trolley in 1894, and after 1898, Ridgewood was subjected to the eastward expansion of a growing New York City. Located adjacent to Brooklyn’s Eastern District (which contained the communities of Bushwick, Williamsburg and Greenpoint), Ridgewood became an ideal location for upwardly mobile German-Americans to relocate, away from the over-crowding and more recent immigrants inhabiting Bushwick and Williamsburg, as well as Lower East Side.

Corresponding with the construction of the buildings in the historic district, urbanization was triggered by the opening of the elevated train around the turn of the century. Providing rapid and dependable rail service, the “El” was extended from its original terminus at Myrtle and Wyckoff Avenues to Fresh Pond Road and 67th Avenue in 1915.

German immigrant Gustave X. Mathews began building in Bushwick and Ridgewood in the first decade of the 20th century. Using wider lots, large air shafts, private bathrooms, and limiting occupancy to two families per floor, Mathews’ “cold-water flats” were a radical improvement to the overcrowded tenement houses of Williamsburg and the Lower East Side. By creating improved living quarters and controlling costs so that the apartments could be affordable to families of modest income, Mathews found a niche in the real estate market and met with immediate success. He built and sold over 300 tenements in Ridgewood between 1909 and 1912, receiving 25% the tenement house permits issued in Queens in 1911. As testament to their improved design,









double wide mobile home floor plans







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