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13TH FLOOR BAD LUCK. 3D FLOOR PLANNING



13th Floor Bad Luck





13th floor bad luck






    13th floor
  • The 13th Floor is the fourth full-length album by the Norwegian Gothic metal band Sirenia and first with Spanish vocalist Ailyn. It was released on January 23, 2009 through Nuclear Blast.

  • The Thirteenth Floor is a 1999 science fiction film directed by Josef Rusnak and loosely based upon Simulacron-3 (1964), a novel by Daniel F. Galouye, and Welt am Draht (1973) (World on Wires), a German two-part television film by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.





    bad luck
  • misfortune: an unfortunate state resulting from unfavorable outcomes

  • Luck or fortuity is good or bad fortune in life caused by accident or chance, and attributed by some to reasons of faith or superstition, which happens beyond a person's control.

  • an unpredictable outcome that is unfortunate; "if I didn't have bad luck I wouldn't have any luck at all"











13th floor bad luck - Bad Luck




Bad Luck and Trouble: A Reacher Novel (Reacher Series)


Bad Luck and Trouble: A Reacher Novel (Reacher Series)



From a helicopter high above the California desert, a man is sent free-falling into the night. On the streets of Portland, Jack Reacher is pulled out of his wandering life and plunged into the heart of a conspiracy that is killing old friends . . . and the people he once trusted with his life.

Reacher is the ultimate loner—no phone, no ties, no address. But a woman from his old military unit has found him using a signal only the eight members of their elite team would know. Then she tells him a terrifying story about the brutal death of a man they both served with. Soon Reacher is reuniting with the survivors of his team, scrambling to unravel the sudden disappearance of two other comrades. But Reacher won’t give up—because in a world of bad luck and trouble, when someone targets Jack Reacher and his team, they’d better be ready for what comes right back at them.

Ex-military cop Jack Reacher is the perfect antihero--tough as nails, but with a brain and a conscience to match. He's able to see what most miss and is willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done. Each book in Lee Child's smart, addictive series (The New York Times has referred to it as "pure escapist gold") follows the wandering warrior on a new adventure, making it easy to start with any book, including his latest gem, Bad Luck and Trouble. However, be forewarned...once you meet Jack Reacher, you'll be hooked, so be prepared to stock up on the series. --Daphne Durham




Who Is Jack Reacher? A Video from Lee Child


Watch the video



A Note from Lee Child

Two years ago I was on a book tour, promoting that year's new Jack Reacher novel, One Shot. One particular night, the event was held in a small town outside of Chicago. The date was June 21st. As I was giving my talk and answering questions and signing books, that date was nagging away at the back of my mind. I knew it had some significance. I started panicking--had I forgotten my anniversary? No, that's in August. My wife's birthday? No, that's in January. My own birthday? No, that's in October.

Then suddenly I remembered--it was ten years to the day since I had been fired from my previous job. That was why and how I had become a writer. That night in Illinois was a ten-year anniversary of a different sort, somewhat bittersweet.

And ten is a nice round number. So I started thinking about my old colleagues. My workmates, my buddies. We had been through a lot together. I started to wonder where they all were now. What were they doing? Were they doing well, or struggling? Were they happy? What did they look like now? Pretty soon I was into full-on nostalgia mode. Ten-year anniversaries can do that to a person. I think we all share those kind of feelings, about high school, or college, or old jobs we've quit, or old towns we've moved away from.

So I decided to make this year's Jack Reacher book about a reunion. I decided to throw him back among a bunch of old colleagues that he hadn't seen for ten years, people that he loved fiercely and respected deeply. Regular Reacher readers will know that he's a pretty self-confident guy, but I wanted him to wobble just a little this time, to compare his choices with theirs, to measure himself against them.

The renewed get-together isn't Reacher's own choice, though. And it's not a standard-issue reunion, either. Something very bad has happened, and one of his old team-members from the army contacts him, by an ingenious method (it's hard to track Reacher down). She gives him the bad news, and asks him to do something about it. He says, "Of course I'll do something about it."

"No," his friend says. "I mean, I want you to put the old unit back together."

It's an irresistible invitation. Wouldn't we all like to do that, sometimes? --Lee Child



Secrets of the Series: A Q&A with Lee Child

Q: Why do you think readers keep coming back to your novels?
A: Two words: Jack Reacher. Reacher is a drifter and a loner with a strong sense of justice. He shows up, he acts, he moves on. He's the type of hero who has a long literary history. Robin Hood, the Lone Ranger, Aragorn from The Lord of the Rings, Jack Reacher--they're all part of the same heroic family. Reacher just ratchets it up a notch. Maybe more than a notch. Why is he so appealing? Most often people say to me it's his sense of justice; he will do the right thing. Even though there is no reward in it for him, even though there is often a high cost to be paid by him, he will always try to do the right thing and people find that reassuring in today’s world when not too many people are doing the right thing.

Q: Jack Reacher gets compared to James Bond, Jack Bauer and Jason Bourne, each of whom now has a "face." In a movie, which actor do you think could fill Reacher's shoes?
A: That's the toughest question. The thing about Reacher is he's huge; he’s 6'5" tall and about 250 pounds. There aren’t any actors that size--actors tend to be small. So we aren't going to find a physical facsimile for Reacher because there aren't any. We have to find someone who is capable of looking big on the screen. Many people have said to me a young Clint Eastwood would have been perfect--we need someone like that who has the vibe of a big intimidating man. Hopefully there will be somebody available like that. It's also a question of finding somebody ready to sign up for more than one movie. They want to make a franchise, minimum of three, and that makes it a little bit harder.

Q: What research is involved in writing one of your stories?
A: My research is all kind of backwards. I don't go to the public library for three months and take notes in advance; instead my best research is by remembering and adapting. I read, travel, and talk to people just for the fun of it, filing away these interesting little snippets to the back of my mind and eventually they float to the surface and get used. The problem is, I approach writing the book with the same excitement and impatience that I hope the reader is going to feel about reading it. But even so, I need a certain measure of technical intrigue in the story. There is specific research I have to do as I go along, anything that's a small detail; a car, a gun, a type of bullet. I will check that out at the time. But, that's what I call the detail--the broad stuff is the stuff I already know.



Meet Jack Reacher
The Killing Floor
Die Trying
Tripwire
Running Blind
Echo Burning



Without Fail
Persuader
The Enemy
One Shot
The Hard Way










88% (12)





????????????? fortune tellers, blood types and superstitions in Japan




????????????? fortune tellers, blood types and superstitions in Japan





The Japanese are very superstitious. Many businesses have shrines; farmers offer sake to the rice field gods before planting their crops; and new cars and Japanese-American FS-X fighter planes are sometimes exorcized of demons by sacred-branch-waving Shinto priests.

Fortunetellers—who use Chinese astrology, palm reading, feng shui and name analysis—are consulted by prospective brides selecting an ideal marriage partners, supervisors making promotion and hiring choices, corporate presidents making important decisions, and store and restaurant owners picking names of their business, the most auspicious time to open, and the best floor plan and orientation of the rooms.

A survey by the Yomiuri Shimbun revealed that 56 percent of Japanese said they had some form of supernatural experience.

Another survey found that half of Japanese students interviewed said they believed in telepathy, reincarnation and "after-death worlds

." Japanese are also fascinated by ESP, UFOs, and ghosts.

Japanese television is filled with shows about ghosts and supernatural occurrences.

Traditionally, Japanese have believed that pots and pans, tools and musical instruments gained a soul through repeated use.

Japanese are sometimes reluctant to buy used items.

Explaining why, one Buddhist monk told the Japan Times, "We are worried about the spirit in things.

Depending on the history of the object, it could bring bad luck."

In Japan it is said to be bad luck to blow a flute at night because the sound may attract snakes.

Traditional Calendars and Auspicious Days in Japan

Until the 1870s, Japan used a lunar calendar with six-day cycle that specified, often in excruciating detail, what days and even hours were lucky or unlucky.

The calendars were based on Chinese calendars brought to Japan in the 14th century. Although the traditional lunar calendar was outlawed during the Meiji period it continues to be used to determine auspicious and inauspicious days.

Many Japanese consult the lunar calendar for taian, lucky days, before making decisions on when to go on business trips, conduct important meeting or engage in other important activities.

According to one study 3.3 percent of Japanese patients stay in the hospital longer than they have to so they can be discharged on an auspicious day.

Sundays in November are hugely popular days for getting married.

The third Sunday of November (Good-Luck Sunday) is often considered particularly auspicious. The Sundays preceding butsumetsu (bad luck days) are regarded as unlucky and many hotels and wedding halls offer 30 percent discounts for wedding ceremonies held on these days but even then there are few takers.

The New Otani Hotel in Tokyo, for example, had 27 weddings on Good-Luck Sunday one year and only three on Bad-Luck Sunday. “11-12" is auspicious because it can also be pronounced as “good husband and wife.”

There are also lucky and unlucky years.

One year in the mid-1960s featured a marked reduction in births because it was regarded as a year for girls "whose fate would be dire" and who would be "un marriageable." Lucky and unlucky years are usually determined by the Chinese calendar.

Lucky and Unlucky Numbers in Japan

listing of lucky numbers

Odd numbers and particularly the number 7 are considered lucky in Korea and Japan.

The number two is avoided at weddings because it implies something broken in two.

Four is considered an unlucky number because the words for death and four have similar pronunciations. Many hospitals and other buildings don't have a forth floor, the same way some Western buildings don't have a 13th floor.

Also, things like dishes and utensils which are sold in sets of four in the United States are sold in sets of five in Japan.

Many Japanese superstitions are based on puns.

Four sen coins used to be sewn into clothing to ward off evil spirits and/or bring luck.

These drive off shisen, which means "4-sen" but is also a word for death.

Nine is another unlucky number. Sometimes if a customer receives a bill for 9,000 yen, he or she will round it off to 10,000 yen.

Eight has traditionally been a sacred number in Japan while nine has been a sacred number in China.

Fortunetelling in Japan

Fortunetelling is a multibillion dollar industry in Japan, with fortunetellers using almost every type of fortuneteller method available: tarot cards, I-ching, Chinese astrology, Western astrology, palm reading and some new kinds that are uniquely Japanese.



The side streets of Omotesando Avenue in Harajuku, Tokyo abound with fortune tellers. Some charges as little as ?500 for five minute palm reading and answers to questions asked by the customer. Most of the clients are young girls or women in their 20s who ask questions about their boyfriends.



One customer who was told her fortune after giving a "madam" a piece of paper with her and her boyfriend's na











made-for-walking




made-for-walking





Cowboys Boot Superstitions

It's bad luck to step into your left boot first.

Drop an old boot outside the front door as you leave on a journey and you won't have any bad luck on the trip.

Tripping over a boot is a bad omen.

If you wear your boots out on the toe...you'll spend money as you go.

During winter, place red pepper in your boots to keep your feet warm.

If you set your boots on a table, you will quarrel with someone soon.

If you stow your boots higher than your head at night, you will have a restless night's sleep.

To walk along wearing only one boot will bring you as many bad days as steps taken.

New boots that have never been worn should be be put high above the floor for luck.

If you give a pair of boots to a friend, he will walk away from you.

Old boots should be worn on Friday the 13th for good luck.

If a father wears his boots while his baby is born, it will be a boy.

Never accept a gift of old boots, or you will walk in the former owner's troubles.

If your new boots creak as you walk, it means that you still owe the bootmaker his/her bill.

************************************************************************************

These boots were up in the hayloft of our house in Ireland when we bought it 15 years ago and I haven't had the heart to throw 'em out...









13th floor bad luck








13th floor bad luck




Bad Luck and Trouble (Jack Reacher, No. 11)






BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Lee Child’s The Affair.

From a helicopter high above the empty California desert, a man is sent free-falling into the night…. In Chicago, a woman learns that an elite team of ex–army investigators is being hunted down one by one.... And on the streets of Portland, Jack Reacher—soldier, cop, hero—is pulled out of his wandering life by a code that few other people could understand. From the first shocking scenes in Lee Child’s explosive new novel, Jack Reacher is plunged like a knife into the heart of a conspiracy that is killing old friends…and is on its way to something even worse.

A decade postmilitary, Reacher has an ATM card and the clothes on his back—no phone, no ties, and no address. But now a woman from his old unit has done the impossible. From Chicago, Frances Neagley finds Reacher, using a signal only the eight members of their elite team of army investigators would know. She tells him a terrifying story—about the brutal death of a man they both served with. Soon Reacher is reuniting with the survivors of his old team, scrambling to raise the living, bury the dead, and connect the dots in a mystery that is growing darker by the day. The deeper they dig, the more they don’ t know: about two other comrades who have suddenly gone missing—and a trail that leads into the neon of Vegas and the darkness of international terrorism.

For now, Reacher can only react. To every sound. Every suspicion. Every scent and every moment. Then Reacher will trust the people he once trusted with his life—and take this thing all the way to the end. Because in a world of bad luck and trouble, when someone targets Jack Reacher and his team, they’d better be ready for what comes right back at them…

Ex-military cop Jack Reacher is the perfect antihero--tough as nails, but with a brain and a conscience to match. He's able to see what most miss and is willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done. Each book in Lee Child's smart, addictive series (The New York Times has referred to it as "pure escapist gold") follows the wandering warrior on a new adventure, making it easy to start with any book, including his latest gem, Bad Luck and Trouble. However, be forewarned...once you meet Jack Reacher, you'll be hooked, so be prepared to stock up on the series. --Daphne Durham




Who Is Jack Reacher? A Video from Lee Child


Watch the video



A Note from Lee Child

Two years ago I was on a book tour, promoting that year's new Jack Reacher novel, One Shot. One particular night, the event was held in a small town outside of Chicago. The date was June 21st. As I was giving my talk and answering questions and signing books, that date was nagging away at the back of my mind. I knew it had some significance. I started panicking--had I forgotten my anniversary? No, that's in August. My wife's birthday? No, that's in January. My own birthday? No, that's in October.

Then suddenly I remembered--it was ten years to the day since I had been fired from my previous job. That was why and how I had become a writer. That night in Illinois was a ten-year anniversary of a different sort, somewhat bittersweet.

And ten is a nice round number. So I started thinking about my old colleagues. My workmates, my buddies. We had been through a lot together. I started to wonder where they all were now. What were they doing? Were they doing well, or struggling? Were they happy? What did they look like now? Pretty soon I was into full-on nostalgia mode. Ten-year anniversaries can do that to a person. I think we all share those kind of feelings, about high school, or college, or old jobs we've quit, or old towns we've moved away from.

So I decided to make this year's Jack Reacher book about a reunion. I decided to throw him back among a bunch of old colleagues that he hadn't seen for ten years, people that he loved fiercely and respected deeply. Regular Reacher readers will know that he's a pretty self-confident guy, but I wanted him to wobble just a little this time, to compare his choices with theirs, to measure himself against them.

The renewed get-together isn't Reacher's own choice, though. And it's not a standard-issue reunion, either. Something very bad has happened, and one of his old team-members from the army contacts him, by an ingenious method (it's hard to track Reacher down). She gives him the bad news, and asks him to do something about it. He says, "Of course I'll do something about it."

"No," his friend says. "I mean, I want you to put the old unit back together."

It's an irresistible invitation. Wouldn't we all like to do that, sometimes? --Lee Child



Secrets of the Series: A Q&A with Lee Child

Q: Why do you think readers keep coming back to your novels?
A: Two words: Jack Reacher. Reacher is a drifter and a loner with a strong sense of justice. He shows up, he acts, he moves on. He's the type of hero who has a long literary history. Robin Hood, the Lone Ranger, Aragorn from The Lord of the Rings, Jack Reacher--they're all part of the same heroic family. Reacher just ratchets it up a notch. Maybe more than a notch. Why is he so appealing? Most often people say to me it's his sense of justice; he will do the right thing. Even though there is no reward in it for him, even though there is often a high cost to be paid by him, he will always try to do the right thing and people find that reassuring in today’s world when not too many people are doing the right thing.

Q: Jack Reacher gets compared to James Bond, Jack Bauer and Jason Bourne, each of whom now has a "face." In a movie, which actor do you think could fill Reacher's shoes?
A: That's the toughest question. The thing about Reacher is he's huge; he’s 6'5" tall and about 250 pounds. There aren’t any actors that size--actors tend to be small. So we aren't going to find a physical facsimile for Reacher because there aren't any. We have to find someone who is capable of looking big on the screen. Many people have said to me a young Clint Eastwood would have been perfect--we need someone like that who has the vibe of a big intimidating man. Hopefully there will be somebody available like that. It's also a question of finding somebody ready to sign up for more than one movie. They want to make a franchise, minimum of three, and that makes it a little bit harder.

Q: What research is involved in writing one of your stories?
A: My research is all kind of backwards. I don't go to the public library for three months and take notes in advance; instead my best research is by remembering and adapting. I read, travel, and talk to people just for the fun of it, filing away these interesting little snippets to the back of my mind and eventually they float to the surface and get used. The problem is, I approach writing the book with the same excitement and impatience that I hope the reader is going to feel about reading it. But even so, I need a certain measure of technical intrigue in the story. There is specific research I have to do as I go along, anything that's a small detail; a car, a gun, a type of bullet. I will check that out at the time. But, that's what I call the detail--the broad stuff is the stuff I already know.



Meet Jack Reacher
The Killing Floor
Die Trying
Tripwire
Running Blind
Echo Burning



Without Fail
Persuader
The Enemy
One Shot
The Hard Way

BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Lee Child’s The Affair.

From a helicopter high above the empty California desert, a man is sent free-falling into the night…. In Chicago, a woman learns that an elite team of ex–army investigators is being hunted down one by one.... And on the streets of Portland, Jack Reacher—soldier, cop, hero—is pulled out of his wandering life by a code that few other people could understand. From the first shocking scenes in Lee Child’s explosive new novel, Jack Reacher is plunged like a knife into the heart of a conspiracy that is killing old friends…and is on its way to something even worse.

A decade postmilitary, Reacher has an ATM card and the clothes on his back—no phone, no ties, and no address. But now a woman from his old unit has done the impossible. From Chicago, Frances Neagley finds Reacher, using a signal only the eight members of their elite team of army investigators would know. She tells him a terrifying story—about the brutal death of a man they both served with. Soon Reacher is reuniting with the survivors of his old team, scrambling to raise the living, bury the dead, and connect the dots in a mystery that is growing darker by the day. The deeper they dig, the more they don’ t know: about two other comrades who have suddenly gone missing—and a trail that leads into the neon of Vegas and the darkness of international terrorism.

For now, Reacher can only react. To every sound. Every suspicion. Every scent and every moment. Then Reacher will trust the people he once trusted with his life—and take this thing all the way to the end. Because in a world of bad luck and trouble, when someone targets Jack Reacher and his team, they’d better be ready for what comes right back at them…










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